Breastfeeding Friendly Halloween Costumes

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmail

If you’ve been invited to a Halloween party, this is about the time you start panicking about what exactly you can wear, especially if your options are limited by the need for boob access. The good news is that if you’re a nursing mum planning to buy a costume off the shelf there is plenty of choice.

Here are a few of my favourite breastfeeding friendly Halloween costumes so far.

Breastfeeding friendly Halloween Costume
Breastfeeding friendly Sorceress costume
Breastfeeding friendly witch costume
Cruella de Vil costume at Asda
Zip front fleece ladies bat costume
Classic Witch nursing dress costume

Anything with “Sexy…” in the name is probably a good bet for breastfeeding access… don’t rule these out just because you’re lacking body confidence. The mini length costumes are perfect with leggings!

Breastfeeding friendly Ghostbusters dress up

I have slightly fallen in love with this “batwing” top. The neck should be stretchy enough to feed in so it’s very practical… Surely I could wear it for more than Halloween???!

Batwings top

If you would rather spend your budget on something you’re going to wear more than once, why not treat yourself to one of these slightly spooky breastfeeding friendly dresses!

Gothic  dress
Skull print shirt dress

Or throw on this great skull print cardigan:

Skull chiffon front cardigan

 

Have a look at all these and more in the new Breastfeeding Fancy Dress section.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmail

Weaned… Just like that!

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmail

Thanks for hopping over from Sunshine Scribbles and welcome to my post for the Keep Britain Breastfeeding Scavenger Hunt Day 7 The End of the Journey; sponsors today include Close Parent who are providing an organic Close Caboo Organic Carrier, a £20 voucher from Burble Baby and a breastfeeding necklace of your choice from Baby Beads for our Grand Prize winner. Over £700 worth of goodies are up for grabs – get your entries via the Rafflecopter at the bottom of this post.

This is a post I wrote at the end of my breastfeeding journey. Beginning the weaning process was a sad time for me as you can read in my previous post.

It has been 11 days since we started weaning, a surprisingly easy process.

Small one has been down to one feed a day for months now, but has been very attached to that single bedtime feed. She has gone without it a couple of times, when she’s fallen asleep on a journey or I’ve been in the bath when she wanted sleep, but it has been a pretty fixed part of her bedtime routine. Often she has appeared to wait for it, not because she is thirsty or not yet tired, but because a 5 second feed before she drops off is enough to complete her day and let her fall asleep content and happy.

For me, one feed at bedtime was a lovely compromise. I got all the benefits and closeness of still breastfeeding, but I no longer had to completely arrange my wardrobe around breastfeeding. Practically speaking, my boobs are so large that I can’t fit most of my clothes and I can’t afford to buy new ones right now so the actual wardrobe stays the same, but not having to consciously think about it or layer up if I’m somewhere where I don’t want to expose my breasts is nice after such a long time.

When, 11 days ago, I first told small one that there was nothing left tonight, we both had a few tears. But that was all. She listened to me, questioned gently, then accepted my suggestion of a cuddle and cup milk while we read a story. I guess this is what happens for Daddy when I’m not there at bedtime.

The same happened the next night – a question, a little sadness on both sides, a snuggle and sleep.

She hasn’t asked for days now, and while the process has been harder from my point of view – we were so close to her weaning naturally – I am coming to terms with it.

If she had resisted more, I would have found it impossible to not continue breastfeeding. As it was, a week away from her 2nd birthday, she understood what I was telling her, listened to me and accepted the alternative I was offering. I’ve had no physical effects – no engorgement and no leaking.

That’s a pretty good second best.

I am so glad I continued as long as I did. I am so glad that I breastfed a toddler. I am so glad that while I didn’t finish breastfeeding exactly as I would have wished, we were able to stop gently and with a mutual understanding rather than with confusion and tears. This must be how weaning is meant to be, so we must have done it right.

Pregnancy and breastfeeding have given me a new relationship with my body. Not only that, but if I hadn’t breastfed I would not have had the inspiration to start MilkChic, which I hope will help make breastfeeding feel easier for other mums.

For more extended breastfeeding experiences please hop on over Fit for Parenting where you can gain further entries into the grand prize draw. Full terms and conditions can be found on the Keeping Britain Breastfeeding website. UK residents only.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmail

My Breastfeeding Journey: Breastfeeding a Toddler

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmail

Thanks for hopping over from Sunshine Scribbles and welcome to my post for the Keep Britain Breastfeeding Scavenger Hunt Day 5 Extended Breastfeeding we have over £700 worth of breastfeeding and baby goodies up for grabs including prizes from More4Mums providing a set of ‘Hot Milk’ Lingerie, a signed hardback limited edition copy of Milky Moments and a £30 voucher from MilkChic  Full details of the Grand Prize can be found here and all entries to be completed via the Rafflecopter at the bottom of this post.

Past knowing that I wanted to, I didn’t have a roadmap for breastfeeding. I had no clue about timescales and I have had to learn as my daughter has grown.

I decided very early on that I wanted to make it to a year. After the initial months, I was lucky to find breastfeeding easy, so I really didn’t want to have to use formula as it seemed to me a second-best option both nutritionally and financially.

In fact, when small one was tiny, I was sure that I would breastfeed until she was a year and then wean. I understood that there were still benefits to breastmilk, but couldn’t see why you wouldn’t express and give a child breastmilk in a cup.

Live and learn… I’ve never managed to express more than a few ounces and the idea of carrying around bottles and pumps seems incredibly impractical compared to the convenience of breastfeeding. Let’s face it, most mums who continue to breastfeed find their peace with breastfeeding in public, but you won’t find many pumping in front of their partners, let alone in a crowded cafe!

I was very proud to make it to a year, although sometimes it felt like I was the only mum in the world still breastfeeding. At our NCT group’s 1st birthday meet-up there were 2 out of 8 of us left breastfeeding. Actually, that’s pretty good going – in the UK, you are in the minority if you breastfeed past 6 months and I certainly felt that way at times.

The 12 month target had become a huge focus for me and I didn’t really question the idea that we would start weaning at that point. It was logical – small one enjoyed drinking cow’s milk from a cup like a big girl and it seemed the obvious transition to make.

I hadn’t a clue how difficult weaning could be. Small one liked her mummy milk and she certainly wasn’t going to give it up without a fight. Cup milk was all very well for novelty and convenience, but it didn’t compete with the real thing.

Unlike night weaning, which had benefits for both of us, daytime weaning just felt like a pointless fight. I spent hours feeling miserable trying to persuade her she might prefer milk in a cup, or fighting sleep as I tried to persuade her to sleep without a feed. It always ended with us both feeling drained and emotional and me guiltily feeding her. Breastfeeding, as always, healed the rift and left us both feeling snuggled and secure.

I was still off work with a back problem so there was no pressing reason to wean, but I continued to half-heartedly encourage her because I felt it was expected.

We had slowly cut down to 3 feeds a day when she developed a chest infection. I was horrified as she had never really been ill before and I felt awful, blaming myself for reducing her immunity. She wasn’t eating and I spent 2 days sitting on the sofa feeding her whenever she asked.

Suddenly, at 15 months, she was feeding as regularly as she ever had, and I had lost the will to wean. I started reading up on longer term breastfeeding and it struck a chord. While I never offered milk, I stopped trying to distract her or worrying about what I “should” be doing.

cuddle

As the small one has become more communicative, our breastfeeding relationship has changed. She tells me when she wants mummy milk and when cup milk is OK and, over the last few months, she has self-weaned from all but her night-time feed. Breastfeeding has become more special because it’s no longer a necessity – it’s something we make time for because it’s important to both of us. When the small one pulls me away from something and insists she needs milk in daylight hours, what she means is that she needs my attention. Breastfeeding gives her my undivided attention and an opportunity to reconnect even in the busiest day.

These days, she both frustrates and amuses me in equal parts, loudly informing our neighbour, “MUMMY NIGHT MILK” as she pokes my boobs or telling me that “this one is done” when she wants to swap sides.

I do occasionally get a funny look from friends when they realise I am still breastfeeding, but the small one is so self confident and independent that they struggle to argue against it.

Small one will be 2 soon. If I’m honest, I do hope she weans in the next year, if only because I would prefer her to have different coping methods by the time she starts school and I want her to have time to adjust. Having said that, I am only too aware that I might change my mind, and I won’t be pushing her to wean before she’s ready. This time, I will be able to explain to her why it is time to stop and it will be a decision we make together.
For more extended breastfeeding experiences please hop on over Fit for Parenting where you can gain further entries into the grand prize draw. Full terms and conditions can be found on the Keeping Britain Breastfeeding website. UK residents only.

a Rafflecopter giveaway
a Rafflecopter giveaway

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmail

Dress to Impress: What to wear when you’re breastfeeding

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmail

Thanks for hopping over from Adventures of a Novice Mum and welcome to my post for the Keep Britain Breastfeeding Scavenger Hunt Day 3 Dress to Impress. Sponsors today include Milk and Mummy with a £50 voucher, Lorna Drew Maternity who are offering a beautiful set of nursing lingerie and Mummy Makes Milk who is offering a signed copy of her beautiful book for our Grand Prize winner. Over £700 worth of goodies are up for grabs and entries are via the Rafflecopter at the bottom of this post.

When your belly is jelly and your boobs have ballooned, even the most fashion-phobic go shopping. This would be fine, except that your confusing new shape is accessorised with this season’s hottest “newborn baby”, a charming but impractical addition which ensures that all shopping must be completed within 15 panicked minutes between feeding and nappy changes.

MilkChic is a fashion site dedicated into women who need to get their boobs out in public. Here is a guide to breastfeeding friendly high street fashion for busy new mums.

1. The Lift Up
Anything with a top which can be lifted to above the nipple – no danger of flashing your baps at an unsuspecting public, but does limit you to tops and skirts or trousers.

Try these:

It’s easy to keep your tummy covered – pick a camisole or vest with adjustable straps and extend them so it sits below your bust or make use of a maternity belly band to keep warm and hide the lumps and bumps.

2. The Pull Down
Any top that will pull down over one breast at a time – stretch fabrics are ideal, but don’t be put off by non-stretch as the right neckline will still give you all the access you need. Plenty of dresses in this category too, so worth mastering for occasionwear!

Try these:

Although your baby’s head covers most of your breast, this can feel a little exposing. I like to layer a pull down top over a nursing vest – learn how to make your own nursing vests easily.

3. The Sleeve Feed
As it sounds – tops with sleeves that will stretch to give boob access.

Try these:

4. Clever Layers

Try these:

  • “One up / one down” – layer 2 stretchy tops (lift up your top one and pull down the bottom one to create a gap for feeding.
  • A cardigan buttoned at the neck like a cape over a pull down top to create a feeding gap.
  • Unbutton a shirt in the middle for quick, layer free feeding access without flashing any flesh.

5. The Random Ones

Love Label Macrame TopEvery now and then you see something really clever – often when a determined older baby figures out a way in! Recently I very much enjoyed seeing a baby latching on through a top like this. Clever child!

 

You can find some more ideas on Dressing to Impress over on Family Fever blog along with another chance to gain some extra entry points to our grand prize giveaway. Remember you need to earn 50 points to be eligible, full details can be found on the Keep Britain Breastfeeding Site.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Keep Britain Breastfeeding 2015 - badge  Keep Britain Breastfeeding Scavenger Hunt
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmail