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Mobile app for breastfeeding mums

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Have just found this mobile app on Twitter – a mobile app suggesting breastfeeding friendly locations near to you, so you can find somewhere comfortable to feed even if you don’t know the area.

It’s very early days but if we all can suggest a few spots local to us, it could become a real resource for breastfeeding mums everywhere! Please contribute 🙂

If you find any more useful apps for new mums, please let me know in the comments.

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Breastfeeding semantics

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MilkChic was born of pure frustration at the lack of clothing choice for breastfeeding mums. Although very pro-breastfeeding at a personal level, I had been blissfully unaware of the wider breastfeeding debate.
Since the website launched, I have become far more aware of the language used to describe breastfeeding and the emotion it can provoke, I have found I have had to decide what my stance is and why.
For instance, I described the breastfeeding techniques I use as “discreet, but I have learned that this can be an extremely emotive term – it is seen to imply that breastfeeding should be hidden away in order to be acceptable. While I stand by “discreet” as an accurate description, this is not a view I would want to be associated with.
Equally, I don’t agree with the breastfeeding activists who believe that by choosing to cover up, you are somehow colluding with those who believe breastfeeding should be only done in private. Surely, the key word is choice? If the aim is to support more women to breastfeed, a woman breastfeeding, however they choose to do it, is a success story.
Of all the descriptions I’ve heard, the one I like best is “breastfeeding with confidence“, as it covers both the physical and emotional aspects of breastfeeding. It doesn’t matter whether you feed with a cover, discreetly under clothes, with no cover at all or anything in between, having the confidence to feed whenever and wherever your baby needs is the holy grail.
For most women, to breastfeed long term they need to be able to feed in front of others, which means choosing clothing which not only works, but gives them confidence and makes them feel good about themselves. Searching for clothing that you can feed in easily is incredibly depressing. I ended up buying nursing clothes that I didn’t even like because they were practical, which did nothing for my self-esteem.
The intention of MilkChic is simple – to give nursing mothers access to clothing choices that help them to breastfeed confidently without losing their own personal style. It’s a simple step towards breastfeeding with confidence.
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Breastfeeding Welcome!

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I was excited to hear about a new pro-breastfeeding initiative in Liverpool, where shops, cafes and restaurants have been encouraged to sign up to a “Breastfeeding Welcome” scheme .Businesses who sign up display a sticker in their window so Mums feel confident choosing to feed their baby there.It would be great to see this idea rolled out across the UK. I’ve been very lucky to only have had positive experiences breastfeeding in public, but I know a lot of people who have been made to feel awkward. If women are to breastfeed their babies for any length of time, then they need to feel secure and confident enough to nurse their babies wherever and whenever they need to.

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