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Win a Contented Calf Breastfeeding Recipe Book

Breastfeeding Cookbook
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Breastfeeding and diet can be an emotive issue – it’s damn hard to cook or eat with a newborn in tow and often the priority is calories rather than nutritional value (I survived on a diet of chocolate buttons for weeks despite Mr MilkChic’s best efforts!).

Breastfeeding Cookbook

Milk supply can be a major concern for nursing mothers and particularly those who give birth prematurely. While, unless extremely malnourished, most mothers can produce adequate amounts of breastmilk, the food you eat does affect your milk and more importantly your own energy levels (a poor diet is more likely to affect you than your baby). Breastfeeding places high demands on your stores of energy and protein so it makes sense to eat well where you can.

Elena Cimelli’s Contented Calf Cookbook aims to support nursing mums with lots of tasty and nutritious recipes focusing on lactogenic ingredients (foods which help promote milk production).

lactogenic/ lac·to·gen·ic  /?lakt??jenik

(of a hormone or other substance) Inducing milk secretion.

Being honest, I have mixed feelings on lactogenic foods. The evidence definitely points to certain foods having milk boosting properties which can be helpful to new mums. However, I’m also inclined to believe that for many there are times when the pressure to eat the right things, use the right nappies, wean at the right moment, have the perfect sleep routine etc. etc. can lead to unnecessary insecurities. I know Elena agrees with me that for the vast majority of us, who are lucky enough to have the physical ability to produce enough milk for our babies, fear and insecurity are far greater dangers to the breastfeeding relationship than a less than perfect diet and the Contented Calf approach is definitely not about increasing the pressure.

So… while neither Elena or I would not want you to start obsessing about your diet in any way, shape or form (for some perspective, read some reassuring facts here), I wholeheartedly recommend this book – it’s a really good recipe book that just happens to be aimed at breastfeeding women. It’s also offers some great ideas for vegetarians and vegans and for gluten-free diets and frankly I love it.

Rather than giving you a list of “good” and “bad” foods, it actually tells you what to do with them to make an enjoyable meal. In fact, the recipes use similar foods to those I enjoyed during pregnancy which did made me wonder if that was one of the reasons I was so lucky in the early weeks. I also like that a lot of the recipes are freezable and perfect for filling the freezer in preparation for the new arrival. Maybe the answer is to build up your reserves while you have the chance?

The book is helpfully split into breakfasts, lunches, dinners, sweet things and drinks. While you might need to rethink your store cupboard a little – nuts and seeds are particularly useful – they are meals that will work for all the family with old favourites such as stew and dumplings and fishcakes reworked to include breastfeeding friendly ingredients. You can try one of Elena’s recipes for Thai Coconut and Chicken Soup here to see what I mean.

If like me, you aren’t supermum enough to make ahead, the meals are designed to be prepared in a naptime. Although I did find the list of ingredients a little daunting at first, the recipes I tried were easy to follow and gave tasty, reliable results. As a cook of limited ability, the thought that I could realistically have been knocking up “proper” meals in a naptime while small one was an even smaller one is very appealing, not least because the thought of me making something decent for dinner would have blown Mr MilkChic’s mind!

Our favourite so far is the chicken, almond & apricot casserole, something that will definitely become a staple in our household. We made this for guests, not one of whom was pregnant or breastfeeding and everybody loved it.

To be in with a chance of winning your own copy of The Contented Calf Cookbook, please leave a comment below. For a bonus entry, either share the competition on Facebook or tweet the following:

I’ve entered to #win The @ContentedCalf Cookbook with @milkchic http://milkchic.co.uk/66224 #food #breastfeeding #pregnancy

Terms & Conditions: Entry open to UK & Ireland only. Closing date: 2nd November 2013 Extended to Monday 4th November 23:59 due to website issues. Winner will be chosen at random from all valid entries. No cash alternative. If the winner cannot be contacted after 7 days, an alternative may be chosen. Disclosure: I received a review copy of The Contented Calf Cookbook: Nourishing Recipes for Breastfeeding Mums for this post so that I could try some of the recipes.

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Feeding your baby in the car the easy way

Breastfeedig Baby
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This post is a guest post by the Sainsbury’s Finance Blog team. Please see full disclosure at the end of this post.

Breastfeedig BabyTravelling even a short distance in a car with a baby can involve juggling a whole load of equipment, and a certain amount of hoping for the best. A long journey brings the added challenge of having to feed your baby on the way – so here’s some advice to help.

Routine
To help keep the whole experience as stress-free as possible for baby (and therefore everyone else), stick as closely as possible to their usual routine. Your baby might not be able to tell the time yet, but they have a very reliable internal clock, and having their expectations met on time helps to keep everyone calm and relaxed.

How to feed your baby
There are several options for feeding your baby during a car journey.

  • Breastfeeding: This is the easiest option as you won’t need to pack any special equipment or worry about getting the temperature right. You can’t do it on the move, however, as it would mean taking the baby out of their car seat – which is both unsafe and illegal.

Should the idea of breastfeeding your baby in a succession of unknown public venues make you uncomfortable, plan ahead. Make sure you are wearing easily accessible clothes and offer milk to your baby whenever you stop even if they don’t seem hungry. You’ll need to plan stops every couple of hours to feed and/or change nappies.

If you think you might need to feed between stops, or you prefer to express when out or about, you can bottle expressed milk and store it for up to 24 hours in a cooler bag with ice. To warm it up, you could either take a flask of hot water and a bowl, or ask service station staff to heat it for you. If you do the latter, always check that the temperature is right for your baby before attempting to feed them.

  • Formula feeding: An easy travel option is to purchase travel packs of ready-made formula at the chemist.

To prepare powdered formula on the road, fill a flask or two with hot water, pack some sterilised bottles and teats, and prepare small packs of pre-measured powder. Bring extra powder along: service station staff should be only too happy to refill your flask en route.

  • Solids: If you want to give your baby a snack to chew on while travelling by car, make sure that an adult is sitting next to them. If this isn’t possible then give them a teething ring instead, or something else that doesn’t involve swallowing, as there is a danger of choking if they are unsupervised. If hunger is getting to them, pull over somewhere safe and allow them time to eat.

If there is someone present to supervise the baby, food such as rice cakes, fingers of cheese, or slices of apple are nutritious and relatively mess-free. For freshly made meals along the way, bring food your baby is happy to eat at room temperature and that are easy to mash, such as banana or avocado. Or you could make up pots of their usual food before setting off, and reheat these when needed.

Author Bio: Kath Morgan writes about a whole host of motoring topics, including family travel, car insurance and safety concerns. An avid traveller, she spent many years living abroad and understands the lure of the open road only too well.

Disclosure: I was offered this post as part of my membership of the Sainsbury’s Finance Family Blogger Network and have not been paid to publish it. As part of my membership, I received a Sainsbury’s gift card but this did not obligate me to publish a post. I have chosen to host this guest post as I feel it gives useful information.

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